Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He

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Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He,bob足球体育首页Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. HeWhatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He,Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He,Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He

Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He,bob手机版网页Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He,Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. Hebob综合app手机客户端下载

Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He,79bob软件怎么下载Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He

Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He,bob体育网站,bob手机体育版Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He

Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He,下载bob综合并安装Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. Hebob棋牌首页,Whatevercriticisms might be leveled nowadays at the way the St. Gregory was run,to Warren Trent it was more than a hotel; it had been his lifetime'swork. He had seen it grow from insignificance to prominence, from amodest initial building to a towering edifice occupying most of a cityblock. The hotel's reputation, too, had for many years been high, itsname ranking nationally with traditional hostelries like the Biltmore,or Chicago's Palmer House or the St. Francis in San Francisco. It mustbe hard to accept that the St. Gregory, for all the prestige and glamourit once enjoyed, had slipped behind the times. It was not that theslippage had been final or disastrous, Peter thought. New financing anda firm, controlling hand on management could work wonders, even, perhaps,restoring the hotel to its old competitive position. But as things were,both the capital and control would have to come from outside-he supposedthrough Curtis O'Keefe. Once more Peter was reminded that his own dayshere might well be numbered.The hotel proprietor asked, "What's our convention situation?""About half the chemical engineers have checked out; the rest will beclear by today. Coming in-Gold Crown Cola is in and organized. They'vetaken three hundred and twenty rooms, which is better than we expected,and we've increased the lunch and banquet figures accordingly." As theolder man nodded approval, Peter continued, "The Congress of AmericanDentistry begins tomorrow, though some of their people checked inyesterday and there'll be more today. They should take close to twohundred and eighty rooms."Warren Trent gave a satisfied grunt. At least, he reflected, the news wasnot all bad. Conventions were the lifeblood of hotel business and twotogether were a help,70 Tuesdaythough unfortunately not enough to offset other recent losses. All thesame, the dentistry convention was an achievement. Young McDermott hadacted promptly on a hot tip that earlier arrangements by the DentalCongress had fallen through, and had flown to New York, successfullyselling New Orleans and the St. Gregory to the convention organizers."We had a full house last night," Warren Trent said. He added, "In thisbusiness it's either feast or famine. Can we handle today's arrivals?""I checked on the figures first thing this morning. There should beenough checkouts, though it'll be close. Our over-bookings are a littlehigh."Like all hotels, the St. Gregory regularly accepted more reservationsthan it had rooms available. But also like all hotels, it gambled on thecertain foreknowledge that some people who made reservations would failto show up, so the problem resolved itself into guessing the truepercentage of non-arrivals. Most times, experience and luck allowed thehotel to come out evenly, with all rooms occupied-the ideal situation.But once in a while an estimate went wrong, in which event the hotel wasseriously in trouble.The most miserable moment in any hotel manager's life was explaining toindignant would-be guests, who held confirmed reservations, that noaccommodation was available. He

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